“The American people will never knowingly adopt Socialism. But under the name of ‘liberalism’ they will adopt every fragment of the Socialist program, until one day America will be a Socialist nation, without knowing how it happened.”

Socialist Party presidential candidate Norman Thomas


Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Caught between the Scylla and Charibdes

Seriously, is California life so terrific that you'd put up with yearly wildfires, that is when you weren't putting up with mudslides?

LOS ANGELES — Rains swept across Southern California Wednesday, bringing flash flood warnings in wildfire burn areas and worries from residents whose homes were spared in recent fires that they could now face destructive mudslides instead.

It can't be worth it.

Virtual cookie to the first reader to name the song referenced in the title.

4 comments:

David said...

Wrapped around your Finger by either Sting or The Police.

David said...

Ed,
what does this phrase refer to?

ed said...

David wins the virtual cookie.

In Greek mythology, the scylla was a six headed monster that lived in a rocky crag near the ocean. She used to be a beautiful nymph but was poisoned. Now she takes our her misery on any ship that sails too close. Out in the bay, there is a whirlpool that is said to be one of Poseidon's daughters. It also swallows up any ship the wanders too close. Only Odysseus, Jason, and Aeneas were able to safely navigate between the two.

As in all Greek mythology, the Scylla and Charibdes are a metaphor. It is more commonly known as between a rock and a hard place. If you stay safely away from one danger, you risk getting too close to another.

If Californians build houses away from mudslide areas, they risk wildfires, and vice versa.

See, I have some sophistication and am well read. I'm not just another devastatingly handsom man-about-town, cracking wise on my blog.

David said...

Your wise cracks are a key feature of your blog! Keep it up. Good work with the Mythology by the way.

Next timne try to incorporate Gordian Knot into something.